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Dude on Internet
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ive always wondered how much difference aftermarket calipers can make if line lengths, line diameters, fluid amounts, and master/slave cylinders all remain the same? how are you adding any more "stopping power" so to speak? educate me.
 

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Typical Smart-Ass
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To be honest I don't know what the aftermarket calipers offer, but I will post anyways.

I assume it's all in the hydraulics of the caliper. Obviously your line pressure isn't increasing, so the only way to increase the force acting on the rotor is to increase the area in contact with the brake fluid.

Pressure is by definition: The amount of force acting on an area, or Force/Area

Therefore, if you have a larger area in contact with the fluid, a greater NET force is exerted on the object.
 

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Dude on Internet
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i understand the concepts of pressure and the basics of how hydraulic systems work, but Im still in the dark regarding my specific question. im really interested to know how this works, help!
 

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GMFS slowest truck :read:
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larger piston circumference. it goes along with what ian said.
 

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Dude on Internet
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
so the same amount of hydraulic pressure dispersed over a larger piston surface area creates more pressure? man i dont know about that. im no expert, but that doesnt seem right.
 

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GMFS Uber-Member
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Most aftermarket calipers have either more or larger pistons and larger rotors. The pistons allow for more pressure being applied to the brake pad friction material. The rotors allow for more friction material to be in contact with the rotor allowing for decreased stopping distance and increased braking force.
Hope this helps.

Later
Chris
 

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GMFS Uber-Member
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so the same amount of hydraulic pressure dispersed over a larger piston surface area creates more pressure? man i dont know about that. im no expert, but that doesnt seem right.
Look at it this way. The PSI is the same. If there's 10 psi over one square inch, it's 10 lbs of pressure. If that same 10 psi is put on say 2 square inches, then it would be 20 lbs of pressure. The increase in an aftermarket braking system usually isn't a double of the stock, but the pressure in a braking system can be up to 1600 psi I think, at least with the Hydroboost systems.

Later
Chris
 

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Look at it this way. The PSI is the same. If there's 10 psi over one square inch, it's 10 lbs of pressure. If that same 10 psi is put on say 2 square inches, then it would be 20 lbs of pressure. The increase in an aftermarket braking system usually isn't a double of the stock, but the pressure in a braking system can be up to 1600 psi I think, at least with the Hydroboost systems.

Later
Chris
i dont think you can look at it that way. in hydraulics, we learned that if you have 10 psi in the system, its 10psi everywhere. by changing the size of your calipers for example, the pressure in your system does not change it is still 10 psi. The 10 psi is now pushing on a much bigger brake pad. Stopping power is not measured directly in line pressure. for example you wouldnt stop any better with if you had 1 million lbs of pressure. alot of it is in the size of rotors and pads along with material.
 

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Dude on Internet
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i dont think you can look at it that way. in hydraulics, we learned that if you have 10 psi in the system, its 10psi everywhere. by changing the size of your calipers for example, the pressure in your system does not change it is still 10 psi. The 10 psi is now pushing on a much bigger brake pad. Stopping power is not measured directly in line pressure. for example you wouldnt stop any better with if you had 1 million lbs of pressure. alot of it is in the size of rotors and pads along with material.
are you a mech?
 

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JetBlue
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so the same amount of hydraulic pressure dispersed over a larger piston surface area creates more pressure? man i dont know about that. im no expert, but that doesnt seem right.
Try stopping a spinning bike tire with your finger, then with your whole hand, using the same amt of pressure. More friction (gained in surface area) = more stopping power.

It's science at work!

-bZj
 

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Typical Smart-Ass
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Most aftermarket calipers have either more or larger pistons and larger rotors. The pistons allow for more pressure being applied to the brake pad friction material. The rotors allow for more friction material to be in contact with the rotor allowing for decreased stopping distance and increased braking force.
Hope this helps.

Later
Chris
That is exactly right :shake:
 
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