GMC Truck Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm considering replacing the factory shocks on my truck. I have two questions.

1. What shocks will give me the best ride? My truck is street driven and is rolling 33/12.50-17s. Nitrogen/Gas or hydrolic? I was looking at the Pro Comp 9000s. Are they going to make much difference over stock?

2. Do I need longer than factory shocks? I know I'm lifted, but I'm still within the travel of the factory suspension components. I've got an add-a-leaf in the rear and Ford Key in the front to bring it up to 1" lower than the rear. So I'm guessing I've raised the rear 1 1/2"-2" and the front 2"-3".

Please keep recommendations under $75/ea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
you can sometimes get edelbrock shocks for $20 on summit racing, I bought a set of extended ones a couple years back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
But do I want nitrogen or hydrolic shocks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,492 Posts
I have gas charged Pro comp ES3000s and they ride pretty good. Think i paid something around $125 for the set. Got them off of Summit's website.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
What's the intended purpose for a nitrogen vs. a hydrolic shock?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Based on my reading today, the problem with a TB crank is that your factory shocks are not long enough and will top out. This will make the truck feel like it's bouncing. I've seen the Skyjacker N8003 most recommended for the front. I have an add-a-leaf in the rear so a N8017 would be in order there. Anyone have a better option for the price?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,303 Posts
I may be giving false information here... But I believe hydraulic shocks use a liquid (oil of some sort), while the gas shocks use just that, gas. I've ran both in the past and the gas shocks handled much better. They seem to be more truck and weight-specific also, with more shocks available for a variety of applications.

I'd look for a good gas shock that's either self-adjusting or one that can be externally adjust. For example: Bilstein 5100 or 5150, Pro Comp MX-6, Rancho 9000, etc.
 

·
Cartmans Critters
Joined
·
8,867 Posts
I may be giving false information here... But I believe hydraulic shocks use a liquid (oil of some sort), while the gas shocks use just that, gas. I've ran both in the past and the gas shocks handled much better. They seem to be more truck and weight-specific also, with more shocks available for a variety of applications.

I'd look for a good gas shock that's either self-adjusting or one that can be externally adjust. For example: Bilstein 5100 or 5150, Pro Comp MX-6, Rancho 9000, etc.
I didnt know my 5150s were adjustable
 

·
NCOR
Joined
·
8,449 Posts
Your typical automotive shock absorber is just a cylinder filled partially with hydraulic fluid that has a smaller shaft that comes in and out through one side with a valve on the end that works to slow the motion of the shaft by slowly allowing fluid to transfer from one side of the valve to the other. By doing this the kinetic energy becomes thermal energy that is transferred to the fluid and by that the body(hence why after a drive the shocks are noticably warm and can get hot if over rough terrain).

A hydro shock just has this hydraulic fluid in it and is fine, but as the fluid heats and gets thinner and as you cycle the shock at a high rate aeration happens, you get air mixing with the oil. This mixture moves through the valve faster than the oil alone and it also does at weird rates.

To combat that the gas charged shock was introduced, it has a pocket of pressurized nitrogen inside the cylinder with the hydraulic fluid and this pressurized gas force down on the fluid forcing the fluid molecules to stay together and not mix with gas molecules.

So obviously the answer here is gas charged shocks are better, the real question is dual tube or monotube. Dual tube shocks are cheap to make and in turn you pay less for them. They are however made to less exacting standards so the tolerences aren't as tight and in turn the dampening is less than presice. In addition with the dual tube nature for the same OD you get a smaller piston head(read: valve) than a monotube shock. A monotube shock is made with a tighter manufacturing tolerence and has a much more precise dampening rate throughout travel, with this it is also more expensive to make so you pay for that. The other bonus is that the monotube is better at keeping the fluid seperate from the gas so it has is better at holding back shock fade.

So what do you buy? I have no idea, lol. Its up to you, buy what you personally need. I had ES-3000's(dual tube gas shock) for while and they were fine for the cost, the dampening basically disappeared at Pismo though and they were almost to hot to hold when you would stop. I never had an issue with them on the street or at Hollister though. Im running 5100 bilsteins now and I didn't have anything negative to say about them at Pismo. The ride quality never seemed to change from the beginning to the end but its not like I really gave them a huge workout with a stock 5.7L, 7k lb truck and leaf springs front and back. Thats all Ive got, Ill stop my novel here:crazy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I appreciate that novel. I guess I'm looking at buying Nitro charged shocks then. I'm 99.9% on the street so shouldn't need monos. Is any one brand significantly better than another? Many seem to recommend the Skyjackers. Are they better than ProComp 9000s?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,260 Posts
i have no complaints with my skyjackers. You arent going to get any extra benefit from running a monotube design like the bilstein's IMO since you are cranked more than your supposed to be. So save money and get the skyjackers or pro comps.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top