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Hey guys! Thanks in advance for the help.

My Inlaws have a 30' something camper and they have been using there 3500 chevy to haul it. However now there ride isn't too dependable anymore, so they want me to haul the camper a couple hours down to the beach this year...


How well do you think it will do?

Do they make air lift shocks for 6" lift? I know it is gonna sag ALOT so i was thinking something that i can put in place of bilstein for the trip and swap them out when i get back.

any other tips for hauling campers?
 

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ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ
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You have 4.88s right? 30ft is about as much as you would want for a 1/2 ton truck, especially a lifted one, expect sway. You will probably have to make a helper bag kit fit, although it isn't hard to do. I HIGHLY doubt you will find regular air shocks long enough to replace your rear Bilseins and the performance offroad airshocks that are out there and long enough will be much more $$ than helper bags. Might want to throw in a trans temp gauge.

You are probably looking at 6500lbs or so for a 30ft loaded with supplies, your towing capacity is probably around 8500lbs, but keep in mind your brakes need to work much harder to stop the bigger tires. MAKE SURE you have a brake controller.
 

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You have 4.88s right? 30ft is about as much as you would want for a 1/2 ton truck, especially a lifted one, expect sway. You will probably have to make a helper bag kit fit, although it isn't hard to do. I HIGHLY doubt you will find regular air shocks long enough to replace your rear Bilseins and the performance offroad airshocks that are out there and long enough will be much more $$ than helper bags. Might want to throw in a trans temp gauge.

You are probably looking at 6500lbs or so for a 30ft loaded with supplies, your towing capacity is probably around 8500lbs, but keep in mind your brakes need to work much harder to stop the bigger tires. MAKE SURE you have a brake controller.
x2!^

probaly going to have to fab up a braket for the helper bag, it wouldn't be hard to make
 

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AllOffTopic.com FTW!
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You are probably looking at 6500lbs or so for a 30ft loaded with supplies, your towing capacity is probably around 8500lbs
My average 24ft weighs in at almost 6000lbs loaded with supplies.

A 2003 1500's capacity is not 8500lbs. The "tow rating" in the manual might be 8000 but IRL you get it on a scale and subtract from the GCWR you'll be looking at 6000 or less. I come in right around my GCWR loaded with my camper, firewood, wife, etc.

I agree about sway...my 24ft is abnormally well balanced, I get zero sway, but a 1500 towing a 30ft is likely to. If you try it you'll need the suspension upgrades discussed here, load range E tires pumped up to at least 65psi, a good brake controller, a weight-distributing hitch, and maybe even a sway control device. Alternatively to the normal WDH and sway control you might get away with something like a Pullrite or Hensley Arrow.

Either way we're talking about band-aids for what is likely an inherently unsafe, overloaded rig that shouldn't be on the road.

Find out the weight of the trailer, either its GVWR or an actual scale weight with full tanks and all the usual crap in it.

Realistically, you could do it and you'd probably arrive without incident, but the risk is significantly higher than with a more reasonable rig....unacceptably high, in my opinion and by law.

It's probably a better idea to use the undependable 3500 or rent a 3500.
 

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I also have a denali gauge cluster with the trans temp guage on it in my back room, but it has the wrong mileage on it.


I guess that gives me a reason to go a head and send it off to get programmed!
Do et!

4.88s and Baer brakes are definitely gonna help, but get a brake controller as well, you will need it.
 

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My average 24ft weighs in at almost 6000lbs loaded with supplies.

A 2003 1500's capacity is not 8500lbs. The "tow rating" in the manual might be 8000 but IRL you get it on a scale and subtract from the GCWR you'll be looking at 6000 or less. I come in right around my GCWR loaded with my camper, firewood, wife, etc.
Not gonna argue with you on any of the other topics, I agree.
I was just throwing a weight out there for the camper. Our 36 ft fifth wheel IIRC tipped the scales a hair over 7,500. I honestly didn't know the tow rating of a 1500, having never owned one, I just did a quick google and come up with different numbers ranging from 7,700-8,800 depending on configuration.

The GCWR for a Silverado 1500 looks to be about 13,000 lbs, subtract the curb weight of about 5,000 (more since he's lifted) and you are left with about 8,000lbs for trailer and gear. Subtract my assumption for 6,500 trailer and he has 1,500 for gear/people. It's definitely getting really close to his capacity, and possibly already there when you add probably 200lbs added by wheels/tires over stock, another 200lbs for lift components, another 100lbs for his stereo, etc.
 

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I'm guessing it's a bumper-pull and not a fifth wheel? :eek:

Like Rick/Garrett said, you're better off being safe than sorry. The truck is more than capable of pulling it at 65mph in a straight line, but like I found out dragging a '59 Ford weighing is excess of 2.5 tons on my car hauler, it's everything else that will get you. Follow all normal proceedings when towing, and make sure the brakes on the camper itself are working. You can rent a WDH at UHaul/etc instead of spending a ton of cash on buying one. You NEED it, don't be that guy with the truck sitting at a 40 degree incline traveling down the highway. :read:
 

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Doin it for the lolz
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If you use a weight distributing hitch and a sway bar you shouldn't have any problems pulling that trailer, provided it has brakes and you have a correctly adjusted controller.
 

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Nobodies said it? 4l60e, keep it in 3rd.

You don't need E rated tires, they just have a stiffer sidewall as several out there, depending on size, are rated the same as alot of the E offerings. Look at the load rating of your current tire, you're only talking about 6-800lbs in tongue weight.

I wouldn't worry too much about the bags if you're going to be using a weight distributing hitch.

Again, provided you have good trailer brakes it should be an issue. Just load the trailer right so you have enough tongue weight and make sure you're using a hitch and ball mount rating to haul it.
 

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Brochure for a stock 2003 extended cab shortbox says that with 5.3, 4x4 and 4.10 gears towing capacity is 8800 lbs. GCWR is 14000 lbs total. if that makes any difference
 

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Dbs>Bitches.
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You should be fine. Get a brake controller and the load distributing hitch and go for it.
 

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the fact that you are even asking shows you are concerned...and i doubt you will drive like a jackass towing. you know your truck isn't the MOST capable, but lets face it, 99+ half tons are prob as capable, if not more capable than most of the the 88 and earlier 3/4 and 1 ton trucks for towing.

a couple hundred lbs one way or the other wont make much difference. you will be close to max tow rating no matter what. drive like its a lifted tow rig and you will be fine. treat it like a sports car and your ass is grass...keep speeds down and keep it in 3rd, watch trans temps, and carry on.
 
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