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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a factory 2010 crew cab 2wd short bed sierra. My truck has factory drums and 4.8l. I'm interested in what it would take to do a full rear-end swap from another nnbs truck that has disk breaks and better rear gear. My truck is weak when it come to towing or even driving up steep incline at speed. Always searching for a gear.

What's needed to swap from the same year model rear-end? Can I put a rear that has factory disks?
How can I ID what rear I need to replace it with?
Do I just look for a z71?

Any help would be greatlyappreciated.

197k mil
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Bump..
 

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Honestly you can swap any rear axle that has the spring pads at the same distance from each other. Of course keeping the same wheel bolt pattern is helpful. I am pretty sure you can use any axle from a truck back to 1988. If you are looking for factory disc brakes 99-02 had those, but the E-brake sucks.

Overall though, I wouldn't stress about the disc brakes, I do not believe they are going to provide you with that much benefit to make it a determining factor in you axle. Gears on the other hand, totally worth it. In which case I think you can get 4.10 gears in axle that will fit all the way back to 2000 from a silverado/sierra
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is there a way to tell what gear set is in a rear end? Or would It be better to just buy a gear set from summit and swap it on my truck?
I was interested in the rear disks because I seem to always have issues with warping the rotors on the front. Maybe there is a better rotor I could get to help with cooling.
 

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If the wheels are off the ground and you can spin the driveshaft. For a locked rear you count the number of driveshaft turns before both wheels make exactly one turn. For an open differential you can leave one on the ground and the lifted wheel will have to make 2 revolutions. The number of driveshaft turns will be your ratio.

The best way though is to pull the differential cover and count the number of teeth on both gears. Your ring gear divided by your pinion gear is you ratio.

Adding better rear brakes won't make nearly as much difference as you might think on the front, especially on a truck where there isn't much weight over the back end. Better rotors and pads will be a better choice. I know a lot of people seem to like the powerstop brand from Rockauto, my experience wasn't great with them, but personally I have had really good luck with Raybestos.
 
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