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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see they offer two different versions of the Tru-Cool 40k kits:

www.oregonperformancetransmission.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=TRU-COOL

I've come across a few NNBS Tru-Cool 40k install threads, but I didn't see the exact kit part # and the majority were for NBS vehicles. My truck is a 2010 Silverado 1500 ECSB 6 speed with the OEM trans cooler. It looks the the difference if the two kits is that one has a thermal bypass and the other doesn't. Can someone school me on what that actually does and would I need it and/or do I already have it on my application? I believe one of these kits is a near swap and bolt on for my truck via using a fitting that eliminates the need to cut any factory hoses or lines.

Does anyone know which of the two Tru-Cool 40k kits will work on my truck best in the Texas heat?

Thanks!
 

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The Canadian
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If you don't ever drive or use the truck in the sub zero temps. you don't need thermal bypass
 

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I just ran through this on my 2009 Yukon Denali. I installed the kit without the thermal bypass. We'll see how this winter goes. Last winter it was cold, but very few times did it go below zero and most of the time it was in the very low temps, my truck was parked in my heated garage so it didn't matter.

As far as the install goes and what additional materials you will need, here is the list of tools and hardware additional to the what the kit provided that I used on my install:
  • 10mm socket, extensions, & rachet
  • 1/2" & 9/16" wrenches
  • small pick or screw driver
  • air cut-off wheel
  • air finish grinder
  • air reciprocating saw
  • tubing cutter
  • flat black paint
  • 3/16" & 5/16" drill bit & drill
  • 1/4" x 3/4" long sheetmetal screws
  • Left over angle bracket from some other project
  • 1x 3/8 compression union ([ame="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0036C9DVQ/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1"]Dorman 490-025[/ame])
  • 2x [ame="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000EPTEDU/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1"]Edelmann A63018[/ame] Transmission Oil Cooler Fitting
Here are the basic steps that I went through to install the cooler which should apply to just about any NNBS:
  1. Remove front bumper/fascia
  2. Remove foam receiver tray (plastic piece that the foam bumper filler fits into held in place by 4 bolts)
  3. Remove stock cooler
  4. Remove the air temp sensor from the angle bracket
  5. Cut off the aluminum angle bracket that the stock cooler mounts onto
  6. Remove the cooler lines from the retaining clip
  7. Cut the line on the passenger side on the vertical section halfway between the bends
  8. Install the 3/8" compression fitting with the line pointing in the opposite direction
  9. Bend the driver side line slightly for better alignment with the new cooler
  10. Install the transmission cooler fittings into the new cooler
  11. Mount the brackets supplied in the kit onto the cooler using the supplied hardware - the brackets on the top will point inwards and the brackets on the bottom will point outwards
  12. Drill 5/16" hole on each of the bottom brackets between two of the holds currently in the brackets to line up with the inner-most bolt holes for the foam receiver tray.
  13. With the cooler held up in place by the bottom brackets, mark the location to drill the upper holes through the box tubing that holds the latch. My holes were almost in line with the bottom corners of the plate welded onto the tube.
  14. Drill 3/16" holes on your marks.
  15. Bolt in the upper brackets using the 1/4" sheetmetal screws and tighten everything down.
  16. Connect the transmission lines
  17. Place the foam receiver tray as close into position as you can so you can mark the sections that need to be cut away to clear the lines, then cut those sections away.
  18. Once the receiver fits properly, place it over the foam which should still be in the bumper/fascia and, if necessary, mark and trim away the foam that protrudes past the sections you cutout on the receiver
  19. Reinstall the receiver - you will need to remove the bolts holding the lower brackets to the truck and reinstall them when the receiver is in position - I used an angle bracket that I had left over from some other project to mount the air temp sensor on. I just put that bracket on with the passenger side bolt that went through the receiver, trans cooler bracket and into the hood latch support. I drilled a 3/8" hole and then had to open it up a bit for the sensor to fit in properly.
  20. Reinstall the bumper/fascia
Getting the bumper off can be interesting. I found it best to leave the bolts (2 each side) that went up into the bottom of the front fenders in place, just loosen them enough to get the bumper out (this requires taking out several of the fasteners on the wheel well liner to access the bolts. For the Tahoe/Suburban/Yukon/Yukon XL, there are six bolts up top and two more down low. If you have fog lights, do not forget to disconnect the wiring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys! Since I have the Fab Fours front replacement bumper, most of those bumper steps do not apply to my application since the aftermarket front bumper deleted all of the OEM front bumper, reciever, foam, and plastic pieces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
In the description of the Tru-Cool Max LPD47391 47391 Low Pressure Drop Transmission Oil Cooler without the external bypass valve:

"When Automatic Transmission Fluid is cold it is viscous. The unique Tru-Cool design allows the colder, thicker ATF to flow more efficiently through two open bypass channels positioned at the top of the cooler. As operating temperatures increase, the ATF becomes hotter and thinner. It's then directed through the core where it is cooled. Tru-Cool's highly efficient cooling technology combines improved protection against lube system failure with optimal heat transfer."


In the description of the Tru-Cool Max LPD4739 4739 40,000 GVW Low Pressure Drop Transmission Oil Cooler with Thermal Bypass:

"comes with a thermal bypass valve so you can use this cooler in cold weather and the fluid will bypass until the transmission comes up to operating temeratures."


Here in Texas, the summers get pretty hot. But every few years, we do see a few days in the winters were the temperatures drop into the low to mid teens. With those factors, do you think I'll be ok with going with the Tru-Cool Max LPD47391 47391 Low Pressure Drop Transmission Oil Cooler without the external bypass valve, but has the two open bypass channels positioned at the top of the cooler?

Thanks!
 

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MILF lover
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ive got the normal one, last winter my trans was probably on the cold side (after a drive maybe 100 degrees cant remember) since i dont have the thermal bypass, but i rarely see 160 degrees in the summer.
 

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With normal driving so far this summer, my temps are usually around 120-140F. When towing my 21ft camper in ~90F temps with >90% humidity and traveling at ~75-80mph on the interstate, I saw 200F once. Most of the time it sat around 180F.
 

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On a 20F day, my trans temps have been in the 80-90F range after 15-20 minutes of driving. Kinda low, but I wouldn't say that it is detrimental to much of anything.
 
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